JAPANESE SALMON over RICE served with a CUCUMBER SALAD

It calls for filets, but I have made it using the whole big salmon filet increasing the sauce. And the original recipe served it over fettiucini, but I like the rice better with fish. It is served with a cucumber salad. I really like it.

Serves: 4
Difficulty: Easy - for beginners

Preparation time:
Cooking time:

Ingredients

JAPANESE SALMON

1/2 cup olive oil
4 salmon filets (can substitute another firm-fleshed fish, i.e. redfish, swordfish, etc.)
2 to 3 cloves garlic, grated with a Japanese ginger grater
2-inch piece of shoga (ginger), grated
2 naganegi, or 1 bunch scallions, finely chopped
1/4 cup shoyu (soy sauce), more or less (Soy sauce is high in sodium; salt is not needed.)
Pepper to taste
*1/4 cup sake
**1/8 cup mirin
***½ teaspoon Wasabi (optional)
Chicken broth (optional)
Cooked rice

CUCUMBER SALAD

1 cucumber, halved, seeded and thinly sliced
½ cup thinly sliced onions
1/8 cup rice vinegar
2 cloves minced garlic
1 tablespoon mirin
1 tablespoon soy sauce
½ teaspoon wasabi
Chopped fresh dill
Salt and Pepper to taste

Toss all ingredients together. Served chilled.

Method

Put oil in a pan. Put the salmon filets in and flip to coat with oil. Rub both sides of salmon with garlic and ginger. Mix together remaining ingredients, except for broth and rice, in a separate bowl. Pour half of the mixture over the salmon. Cook over medium heat, covered, for 5 minutes. Turn salmon and add the rest of the mixture. If it needs more liquid, add chicken broth 1/4 cup at a time. When salmon is opaque all the way through, remove from heat. Place the salmon on top of the rice and pour remaining liquid over salmon and rice. Garnish with slivered pickled ginger.

*sake
Definition: [SAH-kee; SAH-kay] This Japanese wine, the national alcoholic drink of Japan, is traditionally served warm in small porcelain cups. The yellowish, slightly sweet sake is made from fermented rice and doesn't require aging. It has a relatively low alcohol content of 12 to 16 percent. Sake is used in Japanese cooking, particularly in sauces and marinades. Once opened, it will keep tightly sealed in the refrigerator for at least 3 weeks.

**mirin
Definition: [MIHR-ihn] A low-alcohol, sweet, golden wine made from glutinous rice. Essential to the Japanese cook, mirin adds sweetness and flavor to a variety of dishes, sauces and glazes. It's available in all Japanese markets and the gourmet section of some supermarkets. Mirin is also referred to simply as rice wine.

*** wasabi
Definition: [WAH-sah-bee] This Japanese version of horseradish comes from the root of an Asian plant. It's used to make into a green-colored condiment that has a sharp, pungent, fiery flavor. Wasabi, which is also called Japanese horseradish, is available in specialty and Asian markets in both paste and powder form. The latter is mixed with water much like dry mustard. Some specialty produce markets carry fresh wasabi, which may be grated like horseradish. In Japan, sushi and sashimi are served with a condiment of wasabi mixed with soy sauce.


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